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20130115
20130123
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
of employment, construction jobs, manufacturing jobs, in the energy space, tend to be higher paying than other jobs, particularly service jobs. so if we see a continued pick up in the housing market, continued strength in manufacturing, this could lead to the virtuous cycle that we have all been waiting for from the private sector. cheryl: okay. now, i know that one of the groups that you do watch, one of the groups that you're actually positive on, and there's not a lot, but it is healthcare, you do like healthcare. tell me kind of some of the names you appreciate right now in that space and also do you think that with the healthcare law, the exchange really beginning to kick in in the next 12 months that healthcare is going to continue that forward? >> we think healthcare will continue to being strong relative to the overall market. one area we like, you know, from a defensive standpoint is large cap pharma. you've seen this big race for record setting inflows into high yield bonds. we think one area that pays dividends that has been overlooked is large cap pharma. and we like names like joh
of the denying quorum and in the case of speaking as long as you cou could, you had to spend time and energy, you had to organize and it was visible before this body. it was visible before the reporters gathered in the balcony. therefore, the american people, long before there was a television camera here, could see what you were doing and the public could provide feedback on that. but now we come to the modern era. from 1970 forward. in which it became popular to start using the objection as an instrument of party warfare, the objection to a final vote. you know, if we turn back before 1970, you had an overlap of the parties of perhaps 30 members. and so if one had used his objection, they'd have a good sense that you would be able to get cloture. furthermore, there was a social contract that you only interrupted the workings of this body on an issue of deep principle. you only blockaded the operations of the senate on an issue of profound concern to your state. not as a routine instrument of party politics. but that's changed over the last 45 years, since 1970 forward, the last 43 years, in whi
alicia keys. i'm sorry. >> today is an incredible day. and you can feel the energy everywhere that you go. in so many ways, every day is a new day. and a new chance. a new chance to be our best. to serve our highest purpose. yeah. so i'm going to need your help tonight because i'm up here all by myself. i just wanted it to be me and you. so help me celebrate this most momentous day. i'll tell you what to do. i need you to say -- ♪ ♪ people say eh ♪ ♪ it's a new day ♪ it's a new day ♪ getting ready, everybody ready ♪ ♪ eh oh, a new day ♪ a new day ♪ celebrate and say eh, eh ♪ celebrate and say eh ♪ yeah because he's president and he's on fire. hotter than a fab as they like a highway ♪ ♪ he's living in a world and it's on fire filled with catastrophe ♪ ♪ he has both feet on the ground and he's burning it down ♪ ♪ oh, oh got his head in the crowds and he's not breaking down ♪ ♪ he's walking on fire ♪ obama's on fire ♪ watch him as he's lighting up the night ♪ ♪ everybody knows the mission is his girl ♪ ♪ together they run the world ♪ bur
we call the power platform, the energy grid needs to be redone, and the knowledge platform. we don't -- we need to do some work on the networks, which is to say broadband, but it's really about how do we apply it? how do we deliver band width that can change education, change health care, change all government services, we get faster, cheaper, better, the same phenomenon on our phones and in our networks, we want to see in public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: mr. levin, how important is speed when it comes to improving our economy? >> guest: depends on a variety of different uses. for example in medicine, we're now moving to a place where we can have wireless sensors improve medicine and that's great. but business uses and other thing things, cameras, geneomic medicine, there's faster networks, president clinton was was dell and he said we can't expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access the speed of korea, and he is absolutely right. >> reed hundt, energy is included in your book on technology. why? >> guest: to quote th
system and allow us to speak to the needs of manufacturing, because many are energy-intensive operations and need to be energy efficient so utilizing energy and build into the equation and also innovation, so doing things in a smarter fashion, and able to compete at the international level for jobs, because as we land those contracts with improved operations, that means more american jobs. and that approach, that cutting-edge thinking that enables us to maintain that sense of productivity and our intellectual capacity as a nation and takes the research that we should invest into and allows us to translate that research into jobs. so there are these dynamics of change and reform that can be brought into the discussions here as we go forward, and that will speak, i think, to the vitality, the economic vitality of this nation and the growth of jobs that i think are significant, that are long-lasting and bring us into a sophisticated thinking, which this american society is very capable of doing. mr. garamendi: last year, you and i talked in the last congress, which was last year, you and i
that people wante. i introduced the mid-atlantic jobs act 2012. it opens up coastal virginia energy for energy exploration and harvesting. it would create 18,000 jobs. we're blessed with an abundance of natural resources in our country. we create tremendous employment and opportunity for inner-city kids that are hurting so badly. i and intent on the full fabric of our community crossing the finish line. that means great schools and good roads. there is one thing standing in the way of us moving forward with coastal virginia energy and that is the obama administration with secretary salazar. we need to diversify our local economy in virginia. i hope we can work with both of our senators to get this done. host: we are talking with representative scott rigell. this is a headline in "the washington post." she talks about a new freshman class of republicans and your class as well that had been a headache for the speaker. there will be a test on tuesday. where do you come down on this? guest: i think we have been good for the speaker. i am not dodging the questione. everybody needs to shoot straight
's needed for what we need right now as a country. >> well, there's a lot more alternative-energy resources out there, but it's also an issue of lack of funds and lack of space, and nuclear power does have benefits, but it's also extremely detrimental to the environment, so i think we should continue to wean our self off of that source and look into more environmentally friendly sources. >> there's no easy answer. drilling for oil can result in environmental disasters like the one recently in the gulf of mexico. and burning coal can add pollution to our air. while no one can guarantee that nuclear power plants can be completely safe, most experts agree plants can be designed to be safer than they are today. >> we see them all the time, but very few of us look closely, so here's this week's "flag facts." >> it's home to the oldest european settlement in north america -- st. augustine. it's where our rockets boldly launch into the final frontier. and if you prefer to boldly go a bit closer to earth, it's the nation's top destination for amusement parks. >> florida. >> florida. >> florida. >>
to school. nathan. tadpole. and help ensure a constant supply of clean energy. the things we build share one belief. that the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. a. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it again -- watch me. just like that one... [ male announcer ] the durability of the volkswagen passat. pa down something he will be grateful for. good arm. that's the power of german engineering. ♪ back to you. >>steve: got quick headlines. in a couple of hours the house will take up a $51 billion bill to help victims of superstorm sandy. some lawmakers say the bill must be stripped of money for projects unrelated to sandy. wal-mart has given a thanks to men and women who served our country. they have pledged to hire any veteran looking for a job. the veterans need to have left the military in good standing within the last year. if they have, head to wal-mart. >>gretchen: the white house has sai
each of your cities and towns, energy, infrastructure, budgets, finances, crime. and i want you to know that we, the president and i, and the important part of that is the president, continues to be absolutely committed to do all we can to help the cities deal with the immense problems that get thrust upon them as a consequence of diminished tax bases, as a consequence of housing, a significant portion of the public and the states that are in the most need. we are committed to having a third phase of the so-called big deal in the budget. we're of the view that just as it took during the clinton administration, it didn't happen in one fell swoop. the economy in great shape and move toward a balanced budget. it started off in three phases. it started off with president bush's actions, the first president bush in terms of taxation before president clinton took office. and then the actions the president took in 1994 and then in 1997. well, we think there is a third phase here that can set our country on a path that will allow us to get our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3
covered because that's our mission for health. the natural energy of peanuts and delicious, soft caramel. to fill you up and keep you moving, whatever your moves. payday. fill up and go! ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. >> okay. you now what if i'm not allowed to be snide, you are not allowed to be condescending. >> stephanie: it is the "stephanie miller show." thirty-four minutes after the hour. 1-800-steph-1-2 the phone number toll free from anywhere. linda in atlanta. hi linda. >> caller: hi. >> stephanie: hello, hi. >> caller: i -- i hope aisha doesn't have to go to court any time soon, because she's going to have to have a huge fund to pay for all of these stenographers that pass out trying to keep up with her. >> stephanie: you didn't keep up with her. >> caller: and here is the thing, there was a special on the white house christmas hdtv thing with michelle obama and she had these beautiful pink earrings, and they were very distinctive, and then i saw a clip a few days ago, with aisha walking through some entertainment show thingy spot and she had the same ea
, to maintain that energy for a whole inauguration. that is one heck of a yawn from sasha. hey, you think it's easy to take an oath of office? the president is kind of 0 for 2 on the big stage and this time, it was his fault. >> the office of president of the united states. >> the office of president of the united states. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> and will -- >> reporter: that's states, states. still it was a glorious morning and what do you do after reenlisting for another four years as leader of the free world? you pause to take it all in. 23 seconds of reflection. >> i want to take a look one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> reporter: you think joe biden was having fun? that smile almost never left his face, and you get the sense that if a vice president could actually crowd surf, joe biden would. and more dancing, the president this time, trying at least, dancing and chewing, chewing and dancing, chewing and chewing and chewing. is that the nicorette we hear so much about? a presidential naugsration is something a family should never forget. sasha and malia
event such as japan experienced has ranged in terms of lessons learned just beyond the energy sector and the nuclear industry to many other areas that could experienced similar events. >> a que. mr. inaba, going back to the effect on the auto industry, are there any changes in return of the resiliency of supply chain or things that have changed since fukushima? >> yes. i think there is a tremendous change taking place. i think we have probably about 400 tier one suppliers but anything beyond that, tier two even down to tier 5, we assume that the supply chain is like a sheep of pyramids and the tier one suppliers take share of the two, three and four out what we found in this case especially the same conductor company it is almost like a spindle, and therefore we have to make an infestation of all of the supply chains all the way down to tier five, so this work has started and what we found is there are about 2,000 critical parts where there is only one single supplier or juan special material for use and therefore there is no replace a devotee on stuff like that. so from then onward
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12